"HYPOTHYROID"


"HYPOTHYROID"

HAS YOUR THYROID LEFT YOU COLD?
ARE YOU OFTEN DEPRESSED?

Fatigue, coldness, depression, constipation, weight gain, irregular menstrual periods, tingling in hands or feet, and dry, thinning hair are some of the most common symptoms of Low Thyroid (or Hypothyroid). But it is important for us to realize that these symptoms are often missed or overlooked in diagnosing a thyroid problem. Many have suffered so long with these conditions that they view them as normal. One
endocrinologist believes hypothyroid is one of the conditions
most overlooked.

ARE YOU TIRED OF BEING TIRED?

Your Thyroid gland controls your metabolism. The thyroid is a butterfly shaped gland in the neck that produces hormones to regulate your metabolism. Metabolism is the sum of all the physical and chemical changes that occur within your body. It concerns all the energy and processes that occur within every living cell. The thyroid gland is part of a chain of glands. It is stimulated by a hormone called TSH from the pituary gland in your brain and, in turn, affects the functioning of all your other glands. When the gland is underactive you have an hypothyroid condition.

THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN HYPO-THYROIDISM AND HYPERTHYROIDISM?

In Hypothyroidism, the usual cause is that the thyroid gland produces too few hormones. In Hyper-thyroidism, it produces too many. As our population becomes more aware of the connection between High Blood Pressure and salt, people or reducing the amount of salt in their diets. This helps to lower blood pressure, but now many are not getting the iodine that has been added to salt to prevent low thyroid conditions.


WHY DO I HAVE LOW THYROID SYMPTOMS, WHEN MY BLOOD TESTS ARE "NORMAL"?


No laboratory test has been found to be accurate in determining the proper functioning of the thyroid gland. The most common method of determining Hypothyroidism is a blood test to check TSH levels (the thyroid stimulating hormone produced by the pituitary gland) and T4 levels (the main thyroid hormone). The main problem with this method
is that some people may have enough of the T4 thyroid hormone in their blood, but fail to have a sufficient amount of an enzyme needed to convert the T4 into T3. (T3 is the active form of the hormone that is the only form that can enter the cells and perform its intended work).


Dr. Broda Barnes, one of the leading authorities on the subject of the Thyroid Gland, and author of, Solved: The Riddle of Heart Attacks and Hypothyroidism: The Unsuspected Illness, recommends the following remarkably simple test that could save your life:

Barnes Basal Temperature Test for Low Thyroid
Shake down a thermometer before retiring and place it by your clock on a bedside table. First thing in the morning (before getting out of bed) place the therometer snugly in the armpit - for exactly 10 minutes. The normal Basal Temperature is 97.8-98.2. A temperature below 97.8 indicates a possible low thryoid. When the temperature is taken under the arm, add one degree to the thermometer reading. (96.2 on the thermometer would be recorded as 97.2) Because a woman''s temperature may vary during the menstrual cycle, the temperature should be taken on the 2nd and 3rd days of menstruation. It is best to take the temperature readings for at least a week and then find the average. Young children may be tested with a rectal thermometer for 2 minutes. Oral temperatures do not give accurate basal temperatures.